dialogue

Watch: How did we become so polarized?

Larry Updike and Sandy Koop-Harder share a laugh during a discussion event at Canadian Mennonite University. (Photo courtesy of Instagram.com/cmuwpg)

Why does polarization so frequently characterize our discourse? How can people find common ground?

Those were two of the questions at the heart of “Us and Them: How did we become so polarized?”, a panel discussion held at Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) earlier this month. 

Listening to those who have left

'He recently left a Mennonite Church Canada congregation that professes open-mindedness and inclusivity. I wanted to know why.' (Image by Arek Socha/Pixabay)

A Mennonite elder once told me, “We need to listen to people who leave the church.”

John Reimer (a pseudonym) is one such person. A soft-spoken grandpa, he recently left a Mennonite Church Canada congregation that professes open-mindedness and inclusivity. I wanted to know why.

On Blogging

I have to admit I feel little bad about my comments on Paul's most recent post below.  He offered a light hearted reflection on how we can complain about 'problems' most people would like to have.  The post triggered a history of comments I have heard (and made) over time.  I responded critically.  I do not feel bad about responding critically but I do feel bad that my reason for blogging and responding may not be clear.  I read blogs only when I feel I can learn substantially <i>or</i> when I feel there is the opportunity for a rigorous exchange of views and approaches.  Blogs

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