Canadian farmers donate 19,523 tonnes of grain worth $4.8 million

Alberta farmers led the way, donating 6,298 tonnes of grain

May 2, 2011 | Web First
Emily Cain, Communications Officer | Canadian Foodgrains Bank
Residents of Aura in the Afar showed North American farmers on a food study tour to Ethiopia reserves of sorghum in their homes thanks to agricultural support and irrigation.

Hungry people around the world are once again benefitting from the generosity of people across Canada. 

Altogether, a total of $9.1 million was donated to Canadian Foodgrains Bank in 2010, including 19,523 tonnes of food grains worth $4.8 million.

Alberta farmers led the way, donating 6,298 tonnes of grain, followed by Ontario with 6,110, Manitoba with 3,693 and Saskatchewan with 3,371. The remainder came from B.C. and the Maritimes.

In addition to food grains, over $4.3 million in cash was donated to the Foodgrains Bank, a partnership of 15 churches and church-based agencies working to end global hunger, including Mennonite Central Committee of Canada.

“We are very grateful for each and every person who donated,” says Foodgrains Bank Executive Director Jim Cornelius.

The Foodgrains Bank used the donations, together with matching funds from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to provide $38 million of food, nutrition programs and agricultural assistance to 2.3 million people in 35 countries.

Over 200 growing and community projects are slated to raise funds for the Foodgrains Bank this year.

“With almost one billion people in the world not having enough to eat, and with rising food prices putting more people at risk, the support of people across Canada for the Foodgrains Bank is extremely important,” says Cornelius. 

“It’s making a real difference for people who don’t have enough to eat.”

--May 2, 2011

Residents of Aura in the Afar showed North American farmers on a food study tour to Ethiopia reserves of sorghum in their homes thanks to agricultural support and irrigation.

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